From the link above, you can read that many customers say that these gourmet dog treats work perfectly when used to train their dogs, and, because of the small size, they are easy to transport when going on walks or to the dog park. These grain free dog treats are said to last a long time, making the small price tag more than reasonable. Many customers point out that, when not sealed correctly, Zuke's natural dog treats will dry out and lose their moist texture; therefore, always be sure to seal the bag tightly!
Dried apricots are other healthy dog treats, as long as your dog eats them in moderation. They’re filled with fiber as well as many other nutrients that help your dog’s immune system. These nutrients include beta-carotene, which is good for vision, and potassium, which helps improve muscle and bone health. Never give the pit of an apricot (or any food) to a dog, because it’s a choking hazard and could be poisonous.
No, not upset – I suppose I read into that a bit. We used to live the the SF bay area and there’s complete PC madness going there. You’re literally given dirty looks by people if you should dare refer to yourself as a pet “owner.” It’s not as if I’ve ever viewed a dog as my “possession” but some crazies there have decided to interpret it as such. My fault for reading into your post a bit too much.
In terms of what to avoid, start with any artificial additives and agents that are known to cause health problems in dogs. For example, food dyes are unnecessary when choosing the best healthy dog treats and so is glycerin (a preservative), because some studies have shown their dangers. Also, while some dog treats brands still use these, BHT and BHA preservatives may be harmful, according to some experts. That said, some other preservatives can and should be used to avoid spoilage, but only as long as they have been proven to be safe for dogs. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are some of those few that are allowed.

Dog food – Yep, plain old dog food also works great as a treat. If you typically feed him dry food, a couple of pieces of kibble will help satisfy those cravings your canine might be experiencing between meals. Dogs usually don’t care a whole lot about what kind of treat they get, just as long as they get something. You’ll be surprised just how effective dog food can be.
Peanut butter and apples are a great snack, whether you're human or canine. Mix together 4 C. flour, 1 tbs. baking powder, 2 3/4 C. water, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 4 tbsp. honey, 1/4 C. finely chopped apple, 1 tbsp. peanut butter and 1 beaten egg. Spoon into small muffin molds and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 75 minutes. Remove chews from the molds as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. For a healthier treat, substitute 1 C. wheat germ for 1 C. of flour, and add 2 tbsp. of ground flax seed.
The ingredients in these world favorite training rewards treats are amazing, but let’s start with what’s not in them. There are no fillers like corn and soy, which many other brands carry. Fillers are bad for two reasons. 1) They’re tasteless for your dog, and 2) they lead to unwanted weight gain. Fillers are also a cheap way for companies to charge you more money.
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
The sweet potato is another human food that makes for healthy dog treats that your four-legged friend will love. It’s not only full of nutrients such as vitamins C and A that are great for skin and the immune system, it’s also a great source of fiber, which can make sure your dog’s digestive tract works properly. You can find sweet potato treats for dogs at your local pet store or make them at home. For a homemade touch, simply boil and puree some potatoes and put a spoonful or two in your dog’s bowl.

No matter what type of treat you choose, Farcas says to make sure treats don’t make up more than 5-10 percent of your dog’s diet. Though the foods on this list aren’t known to cause problems for dogs, keep in mind that you should discuss any dietary concerns with your veterinarian and know that they might have a different outlook on feeding certain foods to dogs.
Blue Wilderness Trail Treats perfectly embodies what dogs truly are: relatives of wild wolves. With plenty of natural meats and no fillers, these treats are meant to satisfy any type of dog. As with most of Blue’s treats, there’s no artificial flavors or artificial colors in these Blue Wilderness Trail Treats. They’re 100% grain-free, which is great to help your dog avoid gaining unnecessary weight.
Teeny tiny bits of boiled chicken, cheese, hot dog or bits of any flavor of freeze dried liver are my puppy’s favorite high value treats. High value treats can be switched up, can be cut into minuscule amounts, are actually cheaper, and work better when you are having trouble motivating a dog or teaching something that requires a little extra effort. We give Zuke’s for potty training and at spurious training/teaching moments when we don’t have other treats right on hand or don’t necessarily need high value treats. So far, she really likes them, but it seems like she’s getting a bit bored with them. They are not my go to for teaching things like recall or sit/stay, down/stay or leave it. Any other ideas besides Zuke’s that your dogs really like to mix it up a little bit? Some treats take too long to chew and can slow down momentum – like Wellness Core treats.

Thanks Kimberly! I never really thought about how many calories are in treats but I guess even small portions can add up if you give your pup a bunch of these throughout the day. I’ve used Milkbones in the past because they’re usually at my grocery store and saves me a separate trip to the pet store but agreed, they are hard to break up into pieces, plus I had no idea they were packed full of preservatives, so I’ll probably switch to one of the more natural brands above like Zuke’s minis. And ordering online via Amazon means I can still save myself a trip to the pet store, thank you!


I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
Not all pets and pet owners who tried these seventh best healthy treats for dogs went nuts over them, though. There were those who would have preferred a treat without molasses, but admit that this is a convenient alternative for time consuming homemade treats. The biggest selling points of this treat are its organic and natural ingredients and its obvious appeal to dogs. Buyers also consider it safe, coming from a trusted brand.
If you’re looking for a soft-chew, protein-based dog training treat, then check out Cloud Star Chewy Tricky Trainers. They’re perfectly sized for any dog, since they’re about the size of a pea. Receiving treats of any size is a reward to a dog, so they can’t tell the difference even if it’s super small. Instead of bulking your dog up with massive, filler-stuff treats, you should aim for smaller, protein-packed bites.

Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
Anyway, this big tub holds loads of treats and lasts for ages. I give Molly one a day or sometimes skip a day because she has a variety of treats. I have found that Milk Bone brand makes many treats that my dog enjoys (except for the actual hard milk bones, She won't touch those). The quality s good and the price is also good for the amount of product you get. Molly prefers Pupperoni or other chewy treats but enjoys these as well so I will keep buying them for her. They're better for her teeth than all the chewy snacks and they have pretty decent ingredients.
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