When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.
Bananas are healthy for people and make healthy dog treats too. They provide long-lasting energy through fructose, sucrose, and glucose, and they also promote healthy digestive functioning because they’re high in fiber. The magnesium in bananas also helps to keep bones strong. Simply slice a banana and give your dog a few small pieces. If your dog is teething, or the weather is hot, he’ll love chewing on some small slices of frozen banana.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
Blue Wilderness Trail Treats perfectly embodies what dogs truly are: relatives of wild wolves. With plenty of natural meats and no fillers, these treats are meant to satisfy any type of dog. As with most of Blue’s treats, there’s no artificial flavors or artificial colors in these Blue Wilderness Trail Treats. They’re 100% grain-free, which is great to help your dog avoid gaining unnecessary weight.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
Prep for these chews is easy. Set your oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Slice your sweet potato length-wise, no thicker than ⅓ of an inch. Lay them on a baking sheet, lined with parchment paper if you have it, and bake for 1 ½ hours. Flip the chews over and bake for another 1 ½ hours. Let them cool before giving them to your dog, and store them in the fridge.
You’ll want to preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit before starting. Then, dump 1 ¼ cups of PLAIN canned chickpeas into a bowl and mash them up until there aren’t any whole pieces left. Yes, it’s important to use plain, unseasoned chickpeas, because they’re the safest for your dog to eat. After, combine ½ cup of cooked rice (white or brown), and 4 tablespoons of canned pumpkin to the chickpeas. You can make them any size you like, smaller for training treats, bigger just for fun. Bake for about 30 minutes. For larger cookies, flip them after 20 minutes. Allow them to cool before feeding.
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.

As with many of the natural dog treats on this list, these liver dog treats contain no artificial flavors or colors. They’re also very low in fat, which means you can feed a ton of these to your dog while training without worrying about making them sick to their stomach, or aggravating sensitive stomachs. Take them in your dog treat pouch and head out on a healthy walk! Make sure you’ve got some dog booties to protect the paws!

My dog absolutely loves it! I've been looking for a good quality dog treat that's also economical because my pup deserves only the best (that I can afford on my sad college student budget). He's a small, 15lb dachshund-terrier-chihuahua mix and inhales small treats so I worry he'll choke on the ones meant for his size and I'd have to perform the heimlich on the tiny thing. So instead, I bought the Large size which are about the size of his paw and takes him a while to chew through. He loves chewing on things since he's still young so getting this size was perfect. No more inhaling treats, chewing through my stuff, and it keeps him busily happy. The box is huge and I got it at an amazing price compared to in-store and the option for his size were more expensive anyway so I recommend looking through all the sizes for the cheapest one because they always change regardless of the product size/weight.
Below we'll discuss more on how to choose the best dog treats that are healthy and we've used tips and advice from veterinarians and guidelines from several studies and University websites to come up with ranking factors for the best healthy dog treats, and after analyzing hundreds of them, managed to find nine options that fit the bill. Here are the top five picks, with more following down below:
Many other dog treats brands load up on the calories with carbs to fill your dog’s stomach. While this might not seem like that big of a deal, dogs don’t need nearly as many calories as we do. For this reason, Zuke’s Mini Naturals healthy moist training treats come with only 3 calories per treat. Instead of packing on the weight, these low-calorie treats are incredibly nutritious and healthy.
Kimberly received her Bachelor of Arts in multimedia journalism from Simpson College. She has been writing about dogs since 2014, covering subjects such as dog insurance, training, health, accessories and more. Her natural curiosity helps her research as she seeks the truth when learning about, comparing and personally testing canine products and services. With every piece she writes, her goal is to help our readers find the best fit for their unique needs.

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Picking a treat to give your dog while training her can be tricky. You don’t want to give her a treat filled with calories. Especially since you’ll be giving her many at a time. You also want one that is all natural, meaning there are no artificial flavors or colors. That’s why it’s so important to read the labels of every food related item you purchase, whether it’s for you or your pet. Our rule is, if you can’t pronounce the ingredient you shouldn’t buy it! Below are some of the treats we’ve reviewed for this article.
Kimberly received her Bachelor of Arts in multimedia journalism from Simpson College. She has been writing about dogs since 2014, covering subjects such as dog insurance, training, health, accessories and more. Her natural curiosity helps her research as she seeks the truth when learning about, comparing and personally testing canine products and services. With every piece she writes, her goal is to help our readers find the best fit for their unique needs.
As with all new dog treats, always check with your vet first to make sure your pet won’t suffer harm from any of the ingredients contained in the treats you’re considering. He may have an allergy you don’t know about, and that could lead to major problems. Always err on the safe side to help make sure your dog stays as healthy as possible for many years to come.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.

I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
P.S.: for Christmas gift, I bought the leash from Strong Dog Leashes For Large Dogs | Comfortable Walks ~ Padded Handle To Hold Strong Dogs | Reflective Material for Safer Walks | for Medium & Large Dogs | 6 feet x 1 inch. I am pleasantly surprised to see that leash came in a very nice gift box (as in the photo). It also has raving reviews for quality, so quite a good deal.
As far as size goes, you need smaller dog treats for training sessions. When teaching your dog a new trick or lesson, you’ll have to reward them several times so they know that their doing a good job. Smaller, low calories treats are your best option. All of the options for dogs on the list are relatively small and great for these extended training sessions.
Give them soft dog treats that are nutritious and delicious that puppies, adults and seniors will love to eat. In classic flavors like bacon, liver and cheese and chewy treats made with natural fruits and healthy greens, soft treats are the perfect way to reward your pup. Shop our large assortment of delightfully chewy and soft dog treats that are grain free, gluten free and contain natural ingredients your pet will truly enjoy.
My Jack Russell loved this, and for 5 years, we ignorantly fed these to her -- two or three a day -- thinking that they were harmless, and she certainly loved them. Then, one day, during a vet visit, we discovered her teeth were rotting. We couldn't determine what it could be because we tried desperately to keep her away from people food and THOUGHT we were doing right by her with her dog food -- and these "nutritious snacks". She had 12 teeth extracted that day. We didn't know then what we know now. Soon after, when we got our German Shepherd puppy, we were told to be very careful what we fed him, so we started reading labels, something that didn't register as important prior. Guess what we found on THIS label: THE THIRD INGREDIENT IS SUGAR. Nutritionists have long stated that the first 3-5 ingredients in a product are it's primary ingredients. SUGAR!!! I'd never buy products for myself where sugar was in the top five ingredients, so why in the name of all that's holy would I purchase it for my dog. In addition, two of the ingredients are colorants. My poor Jack Russell lost 12 teeth, and I now suspect this is why. If I could prove it was this product, I'd sue this company for her $1,000 dental bill.
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