No matter what type of treat you choose, Farcas says to make sure treats don’t make up more than 5-10 percent of your dog’s diet. Though the foods on this list aren’t known to cause problems for dogs, keep in mind that you should discuss any dietary concerns with your veterinarian and know that they might have a different outlook on feeding certain foods to dogs.
As with all new dog treats, always check with your vet first to make sure your pet won’t suffer harm from any of the ingredients contained in the treats you’re considering. He may have an allergy you don’t know about, and that could lead to major problems. Always err on the safe side to help make sure your dog stays as healthy as possible for many years to come.
Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
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You’ll want to preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit before starting. Then, dump 1 ¼ cups of PLAIN canned chickpeas into a bowl and mash them up until there aren’t any whole pieces left. Yes, it’s important to use plain, unseasoned chickpeas, because they’re the safest for your dog to eat. After, combine ½ cup of cooked rice (white or brown), and 4 tablespoons of canned pumpkin to the chickpeas. You can make them any size you like, smaller for training treats, bigger just for fun. Bake for about 30 minutes. For larger cookies, flip them after 20 minutes. Allow them to cool before feeding.
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
Yes, I care about my dog and his health. However I don’t have any misconceptions about how long his life will be. He’s a GSD and will live somewhere between 12-15 years. Breaking the bank with all this supposed “SUPER QUALITY/ORGANIC” crap MIGHT get me another year… there’s no telling. Then again, some environmental condition completely out of my control could take my GSD from me 2-4 years earlier no matter how much money I spend on this over-hyped trendy food/treats.

You’ll want to preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit before starting. Then, dump 1 ¼ cups of PLAIN canned chickpeas into a bowl and mash them up until there aren’t any whole pieces left. Yes, it’s important to use plain, unseasoned chickpeas, because they’re the safest for your dog to eat. After, combine ½ cup of cooked rice (white or brown), and 4 tablespoons of canned pumpkin to the chickpeas. You can make them any size you like, smaller for training treats, bigger just for fun. Bake for about 30 minutes. For larger cookies, flip them after 20 minutes. Allow them to cool before feeding.
Yes, I care about my dog and his health. However I don’t have any misconceptions about how long his life will be. He’s a GSD and will live somewhere between 12-15 years. Breaking the bank with all this supposed “SUPER QUALITY/ORGANIC” crap MIGHT get me another year… there’s no telling. Then again, some environmental condition completely out of my control could take my GSD from me 2-4 years earlier no matter how much money I spend on this over-hyped trendy food/treats.

As much as we love our four-legged friend, some of us have a tendency to spoil them a little bit, giving them treats containing ingredients that might not be that great for them. When your pup is looking at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s difficult, if not impossible, not to spoil them a little. But, with spoiling, comes the importance of providing healthy dog treats, instead of treats filled with calories and unhealthy ingredients.

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