Yes, I care about my dog and his health. However I don’t have any misconceptions about how long his life will be. He’s a GSD and will live somewhere between 12-15 years. Breaking the bank with all this supposed “SUPER QUALITY/ORGANIC” crap MIGHT get me another year… there’s no telling. Then again, some environmental condition completely out of my control could take my GSD from me 2-4 years earlier no matter how much money I spend on this over-hyped trendy food/treats.
The healthy ingredients is what drew me to this recipe, however I had to add an additional 2 cups of flour (all purpose, since I only purchases the amount of whole wheat it calls for). The dough was still incredibly sticky and very difficult to roll out. I gave up after 1 sheet and put the rest in the fridge. I think the water needs to be reduced by half, and possibly more flour to make it workable. Hope this helps others in the future.
A caveat here: there are tons of (many times conflicting) reports about what and what not to feed your dog. Some people say milk is okay. Others say it’s a no-no. Some swear that garlic is a death sentence. Others say they’ve been feeding their dog garlic for years. Some feed their dogs only raw meat, others swear that’ll ruin your dog’s digestion. As with all decisions regarding the health of your loved ones, it’s probably best to check with a trained health care professional when introducing any kinds of new foods. A vet can give you a definitive “yes” or “no” on what should end up in your pup’s bowl.
Farcas says there’s another plus side to treating dogs with fruits and vegetables: fewer calories. “Often giving fresh fruits and vegetables is fewer calories than providing cookie-type, commercial treats,” she says. “Since there’s a tendency to over-provide treats to our pets and there’s a trend of obesity in our pets, I think that is an important concern.”
These treats are also on point nutritionally so you don’t need to worry about your dog packing on the pounds if you’re rewarding them little and often (although it's always a good idea to keep tabs on how much they're eating!). Made of natural whole food ingredients sourced from right here in the US and even supplemented with added antioxidants, these small-sized treats are just 3.5 calories each.
The story of Milk-Bone Biscuits began in 1908, when they were created by F.H. Bennett Biscuit Company in a small bakery in New York City. Today, Milk-Bone offers a wide selection of dog treats, catering to dogs of all shapes and sizes. The biscuits are baked with premium ingredients and fortified with minerals and vitamins, making them a wholesome, nutritionally sound choice for your canine friend. With more than 20 varieties of Milk-Bone treats to choose from, it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.
Chicken, Soy Grits, Sugar, Corn Starch, Salt, Rice Flour, Dicalcium Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Guar Gum, Natural Smoke Flavor, Lactic Acid, Garlic Powder, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), BHA (Used as a Preservative).
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
The healthy ingredients is what drew me to this recipe, however I had to add an additional 2 cups of flour (all purpose, since I only purchases the amount of whole wheat it calls for). The dough was still incredibly sticky and very difficult to roll out. I gave up after 1 sheet and put the rest in the fridge. I think the water needs to be reduced by half, and possibly more flour to make it workable. Hope this helps others in the future.
One concern that a small amount of customers have is that the ingredient list includes both garlic and sodium nitrate, both of which are said to be toxic for canines. A spokesperson from the company assures readers that the amount of each is minimal (less than a few ounces of sodium nitrate per one hundred pounds of meat and less than 1% garlic per batch). He also says there are mixed reports as to whether or not garlic is okay for pets, ensuring that a small amount is not thought to be a threat regardless.
Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.

A little baked chicken once in awhile is another great lean meat option for healthy dog treats. It’s rich in essential amino acids, which promote overall health. And provides protein for proper immune system functioning as well as a boost of energy. Just make sure you don’t overdo it, don’t put any seasonings on it, and never feed your dog chicken that contains bones.
As with many of the natural dog treats on this list, these liver dog treats contain no artificial flavors or colors. They’re also very low in fat, which means you can feed a ton of these to your dog while training without worrying about making them sick to their stomach, or aggravating sensitive stomachs. Take them in your dog treat pouch and head out on a healthy walk! Make sure you’ve got some dog booties to protect the paws!
A little baked chicken once in awhile is another great lean meat option for healthy dog treats. It’s rich in essential amino acids, which promote overall health. And provides protein for proper immune system functioning as well as a boost of energy. Just make sure you don’t overdo it, don’t put any seasonings on it, and never feed your dog chicken that contains bones.
As far as size goes, you need smaller dog treats for training sessions. When teaching your dog a new trick or lesson, you’ll have to reward them several times so they know that their doing a good job. Smaller, low calories treats are your best option. All of the options for dogs on the list are relatively small and great for these extended training sessions.
Zuke’s Mini Naturals healthy moist training treats come with multiple healthy ingredients to keep your dog healthily energized and ready to train. There are all kinds of delicious dog food that make up these little treats. One of the most impressive facts about these treats is that they’re made without fillers like wheat, corn, and soy which are all common in most dog treats.
Riley’s Organics has again come up with a great food option for dogs and ranks as the seventh best healthy dog treats choice on this list. Like other Riley’s products, this is made in the US and certified organic by the USDA. These finger-licking peanut butter biscuits are made from the finest human-grade ingredients. There are no wheat, corn or soy ingredients, which are often the source of allergies.
These bone-shaped treats also do not contain any preservatives, artificial flavoring, artificial coloring, sugar or salt. Pet owners who live healthy lifestyles and practice healthy eating habits are very satisfied to find a product for their pets that is aligned to their own food choices. Their canine companions can now enjoy healthy and organic snacks, which are not only tasty but also a good source of carbohydrates, minerals, and proteins.
Back in the 90’s, a dog named Dingo loved to chew on anything in his way. His owner, Les, decided that the best way to prevent him from doing this was to feed him chewy treats as well as giving him an indestructible dog toy to chew in the meantime. Dogs and puppies love to chew, which is why they chew our shoes and wallets. Les figured that the best way to deal with this issue was to give Dingo exactly what he wanted: dog chews!
My Jack Russell loved this, and for 5 years, we ignorantly fed these to her -- two or three a day -- thinking that they were harmless, and she certainly loved them. Then, one day, during a vet visit, we discovered her teeth were rotting. We couldn't determine what it could be because we tried desperately to keep her away from people food and THOUGHT we were doing right by her with her dog food -- and these "nutritious snacks". She had 12 teeth extracted that day. We didn't know then what we know now. Soon after, when we got our German Shepherd puppy, we were told to be very careful what we fed him, so we started reading labels, something that didn't register as important prior. Guess what we found on THIS label: THE THIRD INGREDIENT IS SUGAR. Nutritionists have long stated that the first 3-5 ingredients in a product are it's primary ingredients. SUGAR!!! I'd never buy products for myself where sugar was in the top five ingredients, so why in the name of all that's holy would I purchase it for my dog. In addition, two of the ingredients are colorants. My poor Jack Russell lost 12 teeth, and I now suspect this is why. If I could prove it was this product, I'd sue this company for her $1,000 dental bill.
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