The more treats you feed your dog, the fewer calories those treats should have! The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention suggests that a dog weighing around 50 pounds should get 700-900 calories a day. A few low-calorie treats here and there shouldn’t have much of an impact on your dog’s health or weight, but treats should not make up the bulk of your pet’s daily calories.4
These do something bad to my dog. Not sure what the ingredient could be, but it's enough that i have finally given up on these. I like them for the texture, but they make my dog extremely hyped up and almost manic. It's like watching a dog on cocaine. Scares me. No thanks. This time, I will remember. I had tried this once before and forgotten until the same reaction occurred.
Blue Wilderness Trail Treats perfectly embodies what dogs truly are: relatives of wild wolves. With plenty of natural meats and no fillers, these treats are meant to satisfy any type of dog. As with most of Blue’s treats, there’s no artificial flavors or artificial colors in these Blue Wilderness Trail Treats. They’re 100% grain-free, which is great to help your dog avoid gaining unnecessary weight.
Many other dog treats brands load up on the calories with carbs to fill your dog’s stomach. While this might not seem like that big of a deal, dogs don’t need nearly as many calories as we do. For this reason, Zuke’s Mini Naturals healthy moist training treats come with only 3 calories per treat. Instead of packing on the weight, these low-calorie treats are incredibly nutritious and healthy.
My Jack Russell loved this, and for 5 years, we ignorantly fed these to her -- two or three a day -- thinking that they were harmless, and she certainly loved them. Then, one day, during a vet visit, we discovered her teeth were rotting. We couldn't determine what it could be because we tried desperately to keep her away from people food and THOUGHT we were doing right by her with her dog food -- and these "nutritious snacks". She had 12 teeth extracted that day. We didn't know then what we know now. Soon after, when we got our German Shepherd puppy, we were told to be very careful what we fed him, so we started reading labels, something that didn't register as important prior. Guess what we found on THIS label: THE THIRD INGREDIENT IS SUGAR. Nutritionists have long stated that the first 3-5 ingredients in a product are it's primary ingredients. SUGAR!!! I'd never buy products for myself where sugar was in the top five ingredients, so why in the name of all that's holy would I purchase it for my dog. In addition, two of the ingredients are colorants. My poor Jack Russell lost 12 teeth, and I now suspect this is why. If I could prove it was this product, I'd sue this company for her $1,000 dental bill.
The more treats you feed your dog, the fewer calories those treats should have! The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention suggests that a dog weighing around 50 pounds should get 700-900 calories a day. A few low-calorie treats here and there shouldn’t have much of an impact on your dog’s health or weight, but treats should not make up the bulk of your pet’s daily calories.4
In terms of what to avoid, start with any artificial additives and agents that are known to cause health problems in dogs. For example, food dyes are unnecessary when choosing the best healthy dog treats and so is glycerin (a preservative), because some studies have shown their dangers. Also, while some dog treats brands still use these, BHT and BHA preservatives may be harmful, according to some experts. That said, some other preservatives can and should be used to avoid spoilage, but only as long as they have been proven to be safe for dogs. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are some of those few that are allowed.
My 145 pound Mellow (German Shepherd) is soooo spoiled and handles it with charm and drooly kisses. He gets treats for being the doorbell and official greeter. No bone cookie cutter big enough but I have a huge yard sale collection from a year or ten collecting. Not a fan of scary clowns so I took large round clown and made large yummy treats. Mellow loves them and I have to maintain control of the treat door. Funny look at first but buried one in his bed, dug it out later and is now sure they are wonderful. Thanks. (my vet says small garlic amounts ok–powder not salt is best). It is some wheat recipe treats!
As you learned in the video, positive reinforcement is more effective than negative. Reward your dogs for positive behaviors, do not punish her for negative ones. The Association of Professional Dog Trainers (APDT) uses treats to train dogs in their care. The APDT suggests using small, chewy treats to help with timing for your training purposes. You can also be generous and give more treats because the smaller the treat typically means the fewer the calories. (You don’t want to make your dog overweight by giving too many large treats!) Besides, your dog doesn’t care how big the treat is. She just loves that she’s getting so many and getting attention from you!

No, not upset – I suppose I read into that a bit. We used to live the the SF bay area and there’s complete PC madness going there. You’re literally given dirty looks by people if you should dare refer to yourself as a pet “owner.” It’s not as if I’ve ever viewed a dog as my “possession” but some crazies there have decided to interpret it as such. My fault for reading into your post a bit too much.
Dogs of various breeds love this biscuit, so it is a handy one to bring during training. There have been no reports of allergies or adverse reactions. There were very few dogs, however, that didn’t like the treat and preferred other brands. Overall, this is one of the best healthy treats for dogs available in pet supply and online stores now that's also USDA certified.
As you learned in the video, positive reinforcement is more effective than negative. Reward your dogs for positive behaviors, do not punish her for negative ones. The Association of Professional Dog Trainers (APDT) uses treats to train dogs in their care. The APDT suggests using small, chewy treats to help with timing for your training purposes. You can also be generous and give more treats because the smaller the treat typically means the fewer the calories. (You don’t want to make your dog overweight by giving too many large treats!) Besides, your dog doesn’t care how big the treat is. She just loves that she’s getting so many and getting attention from you!
The story of Milk-Bone Biscuits began in 1908, when they were created by F.H. Bennett Biscuit Company in a small bakery in New York City. Today, Milk-Bone offers a wide selection of dog treats, catering to dogs of all shapes and sizes. The biscuits are baked with premium ingredients and fortified with minerals and vitamins, making them a wholesome, nutritionally sound choice for your canine friend. With more than 20 varieties of Milk-Bone treats to choose from, it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.
My dog absolutely loves it! I've been looking for a good quality dog treat that's also economical because my pup deserves only the best (that I can afford on my sad college student budget). He's a small, 15lb dachshund-terrier-chihuahua mix and inhales small treats so I worry he'll choke on the ones meant for his size and I'd have to perform the heimlich on the tiny thing. So instead, I bought the Large size which are about the size of his paw and takes him a while to chew through. He loves chewing on things since he's still young so getting this size was perfect. No more inhaling treats, chewing through my stuff, and it keeps him busily happy. The box is huge and I got it at an amazing price compared to in-store and the option for his size were more expensive anyway so I recommend looking through all the sizes for the cheapest one because they always change regardless of the product size/weight.
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