If you want to mix in a little seafood to your dog’s diet as an occasional treat, baked salmon can be great healthy and natural dog treats. You have to make sure it’s baked, however, and never give your canine raw fish of any kind. That could not only make your dog extremely sick, it could even be fatal. Salmon is a lean meat and is an excellent source of not only protein but also omega-3 fatty acids. These help make sure your dog’s immune system works as it should, and also promotes a shiny, healthy coat. Look for an easy recipe online for the best way to cook the salmon, and at what temperature.
As with all new dog treats, always check with your vet first to make sure your pet won’t suffer harm from any of the ingredients contained in the treats you’re considering. He may have an allergy you don’t know about, and that could lead to major problems. Always err on the safe side to help make sure your dog stays as healthy as possible for many years to come.

Fruits and vegetables – Green beans not only provide the crunch that your dog loves, they’re also low in calories. Apples and raspberries are also low in calories and high in fiber. This will not only promote good digestion, but will also give him a feeling of fullness.2 As a result, your dog might not attack the dinner bowl quite as hard as usual.


A caveat here: there are tons of (many times conflicting) reports about what and what not to feed your dog. Some people say milk is okay. Others say it’s a no-no. Some swear that garlic is a death sentence. Others say they’ve been feeding their dog garlic for years. Some feed their dogs only raw meat, others swear that’ll ruin your dog’s digestion. As with all decisions regarding the health of your loved ones, it’s probably best to check with a trained health care professional when introducing any kinds of new foods. A vet can give you a definitive “yes” or “no” on what should end up in your pup’s bowl.
Dog food – Yep, plain old dog food also works great as a treat. If you typically feed him dry food, a couple of pieces of kibble will help satisfy those cravings your canine might be experiencing between meals. Dogs usually don’t care a whole lot about what kind of treat they get, just as long as they get something. You’ll be surprised just how effective dog food can be.
Kimberly received her Bachelor of Arts in multimedia journalism from Simpson College. She has been writing about dogs since 2014, covering subjects such as dog insurance, training, health, accessories and more. Her natural curiosity helps her research as she seeks the truth when learning about, comparing and personally testing canine products and services. With every piece she writes, her goal is to help our readers find the best fit for their unique needs.
Farcas says there’s another plus side to treating dogs with fruits and vegetables: fewer calories. “Often giving fresh fruits and vegetables is fewer calories than providing cookie-type, commercial treats,” she says. “Since there’s a tendency to over-provide treats to our pets and there’s a trend of obesity in our pets, I think that is an important concern.”
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If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
This DIY recipe is super easy for any pet owner, and combines two already healthy treats into an exciting snack. You can simply dip a baby carrot into a teaspoon of natural peanut butter and voila! An easy treat. Another option is to use shredded carrots, combine them with peanut butter, and roll them into little balls. These peanut butter carrot balls can be fed fresh or frozen.

My little Yorkie is so picky. She detests regular milk bones and will not touch them so I was taking a chance buying her this big jar of Milk Bone Soft & Chewy Bones. They came yesterday along with some other treats I bought for her and I decided to offer her one of these bones first. She gets excited when new treats come and was hoping, I think, for more Beggin' Strips but I wanted to change things up. Plus these are actually pretty healthy for her and not too high in calories. She is only eight pounds but the vet wants me to keep her at that weight to avoid issues later on. She is 3 years old now and healthy.


Many outgoing links on Wholefully are affiliate links. If you purchase a product after clicking an affiliate link, I receive a small percentage of the sale for referring you, at no extra cost to you. Wholefully/Back to Her Roots, LLC is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
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