Kimberly grew up in a family that loved Labrador Retrievers and remembers running and playing in the yard with them as a child. In 2017, she and her husband adopted their Coonhound mix, Sally, from a local shelter. Kimberly's research was put to good use since Sally faced some aggression issues with other dogs and needed some training to be an inside dog. She worked daily with Sally and sought help from professionals to help Sally become the happy pup she is today.
What can you replace wheat germ with? I made these and I used a cup of oats that I ground to a powder in the food processor since I forgot to buy it and I had to make these treats on my day off…I also added peanut butter! I figured i’d ask for the next batch 🙂 they came out great and they are so healthy you did great research! Roxy and Mojo thank you!
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
My Jack Russell loved this, and for 5 years, we ignorantly fed these to her -- two or three a day -- thinking that they were harmless, and she certainly loved them. Then, one day, during a vet visit, we discovered her teeth were rotting. We couldn't determine what it could be because we tried desperately to keep her away from people food and THOUGHT we were doing right by her with her dog food -- and these "nutritious snacks". She had 12 teeth extracted that day. We didn't know then what we know now. Soon after, when we got our German Shepherd puppy, we were told to be very careful what we fed him, so we started reading labels, something that didn't register as important prior. Guess what we found on THIS label: THE THIRD INGREDIENT IS SUGAR. Nutritionists have long stated that the first 3-5 ingredients in a product are it's primary ingredients. SUGAR!!! I'd never buy products for myself where sugar was in the top five ingredients, so why in the name of all that's holy would I purchase it for my dog. In addition, two of the ingredients are colorants. My poor Jack Russell lost 12 teeth, and I now suspect this is why. If I could prove it was this product, I'd sue this company for her $1,000 dental bill.
It may not be a good idea to stock up on several bags, as the main issue with this eight best healthy dog treats choice is that a few pet owners noticed some molds formed in the older bags. They may also become hard and dry the longer they are stocked, instead of soft and chewy like granola. Aside from that, pets just loved these treats, and owners feel assured that they’re nutritious and safe for their dogs.
You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
I think this may be laced with doggie drugs or something...my dogs can't ever get enough of it & will stop at nothing for a dog treat. Seriously. They almost smothered me to death just today over the possibility of getting a dog treat when I asked the question, "Whooooo wants a cookie?" Both dogs (a pushy boxer & a bossy Westie), decided today that, instead of calmly following me back to the area where treats are kept, they would throw their bodies upon mine & attempt murder in the 1st degree by smothering me with what I can only assume they wanted me to believe & THINK were puppy kisses. Hmph. Puppy kisses, my elbow.
If you want to mix in a little seafood to your dog’s diet as an occasional treat, baked salmon can be great healthy and natural dog treats. You have to make sure it’s baked, however, and never give your canine raw fish of any kind. That could not only make your dog extremely sick, it could even be fatal. Salmon is a lean meat and is an excellent source of not only protein but also omega-3 fatty acids. These help make sure your dog’s immune system works as it should, and also promotes a shiny, healthy coat. Look for an easy recipe online for the best way to cook the salmon, and at what temperature.

The story of Milk-Bone Biscuits began in 1908, when they were created by F.H. Bennett Biscuit Company in a small bakery in New York City. Today, Milk-Bone offers a wide selection of dog treats, catering to dogs of all shapes and sizes. The biscuits are baked with premium ingredients and fortified with minerals and vitamins, making them a wholesome, nutritionally sound choice for your canine friend. With more than 20 varieties of Milk-Bone treats to choose from, it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.

Although the price is relatively affordable and seems acceptable to most pet parents, some customers recommend breaking every doggy treat into two pieces to get even more value per bag. A few customers have expressed their concerns about their dog refusing to eat these all natural dog treats, and some canines also had stomach problems after having the treat, including vomiting or gas. However, these cases seem to be very rare. Other customers also mentioned that the crumbly texture of these healthy dog treats can make a mess and that their dogs would rather play with these pet treats instead of actually eating them.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
Peanut butter and apples are a great snack, whether you're human or canine. Mix together 4 C. flour, 1 tbs. baking powder, 2 3/4 C. water, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 4 tbsp. honey, 1/4 C. finely chopped apple, 1 tbsp. peanut butter and 1 beaten egg. Spoon into small muffin molds and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 75 minutes. Remove chews from the molds as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. For a healthier treat, substitute 1 C. wheat germ for 1 C. of flour, and add 2 tbsp. of ground flax seed.

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Dogs love to be praised and rewarded when they do something good, and one of the best rewards they can receive is a doggie treat. But with so many varieties of treats available today, it's tough to know which one your pooch will appreciate more. To help, here are a few thoughts about the types of treats available and the pros and cons of each, along with some of the most popular doggie treats on the market.
At only 3.5 calories per treat, these tiny low calorie healthy treats for dogs are made with real meat which is great when used for your dog training purposes. Zuke's moist nugget treats are made in the USA, and the company prides themselves for sticking to their all natural dog treats label: they use no wheat, corn, or soy, but only natural wholefood ingredients.
Teeny tiny bits of boiled chicken, cheese, hot dog or bits of any flavor of freeze dried liver are my puppy’s favorite high value treats. High value treats can be switched up, can be cut into minuscule amounts, are actually cheaper, and work better when you are having trouble motivating a dog or teaching something that requires a little extra effort. We give Zuke’s for potty training and at spurious training/teaching moments when we don’t have other treats right on hand or don’t necessarily need high value treats. So far, she really likes them, but it seems like she’s getting a bit bored with them. They are not my go to for teaching things like recall or sit/stay, down/stay or leave it. Any other ideas besides Zuke’s that your dogs really like to mix it up a little bit? Some treats take too long to chew and can slow down momentum – like Wellness Core treats.
The sweet potato is another human food that makes for healthy dog treats that your four-legged friend will love. It’s not only full of nutrients such as vitamins C and A that are great for skin and the immune system, it’s also a great source of fiber, which can make sure your dog’s digestive tract works properly. You can find sweet potato treats for dogs at your local pet store or make them at home. For a homemade touch, simply boil and puree some potatoes and put a spoonful or two in your dog’s bowl.
And as far as taste goes, I didn’t try ’em out (although I could, because it’s all human food), but our puppers love them. Rory in particular will literally stand in front of the cabinet that holds these treats and whine at the door, hoping that it’ll magically open and the whole bag of treats will spill onto the floor. She’s a big fan. And I’m a big fan of knowing all the ingredients and of saving a pretty penny by making these over the high-quality, all-natural treats I have been buying her.
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In terms of what to avoid, start with any artificial additives and agents that are known to cause health problems in dogs. For example, food dyes are unnecessary when choosing the best healthy dog treats and so is glycerin (a preservative), because some studies have shown their dangers. Also, while some dog treats brands still use these, BHT and BHA preservatives may be harmful, according to some experts. That said, some other preservatives can and should be used to avoid spoilage, but only as long as they have been proven to be safe for dogs. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are some of those few that are allowed.
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.
Healthy dog treats reviews from pet owners: “I tried these out while I was visiting my daughter in Wisconsin. My dog has food allergies and this is the first treat that she has been able to eat in addition to her $94 a bag prescription dog food. This organic treat is her favorite out of all treats she has tried and she can have these as long as they work!…”
Kimberly received her Bachelor of Arts in multimedia journalism from Simpson College. She has been writing about dogs since 2014, covering subjects such as dog insurance, training, health, accessories and more. Her natural curiosity helps her research as she seeks the truth when learning about, comparing and personally testing canine products and services. With every piece she writes, her goal is to help our readers find the best fit for their unique needs.
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