Oven baked with love and coated in raw goodness, the first biscuit treats that truly mirror a whole prey diet! Our Raw Coated Biscuits are full of meat and organ meat for a treat as nature intended that your dog will go wild for! We start with the world’s finest ingredients. Next we gently bake with love in small batches and finally we coat every biscuit in raw goodness to make the perfect treat!

My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.


Next, look for the calorie count of each treat. Manufacturers of healthy treats want you to know just how good their product is, and most are happy to advertise the calories per treat. This is important because it’s easy to overlook that that those calories add up over the course of a day, so even if the treat is healthy if you give too many it becomes unhealthy.

What can you replace wheat germ with? I made these and I used a cup of oats that I ground to a powder in the food processor since I forgot to buy it and I had to make these treats on my day off…I also added peanut butter! I figured i’d ask for the next batch 🙂 they came out great and they are so healthy you did great research! Roxy and Mojo thank you!


If you’re looking for a soft-chew, protein-based dog training treat, then check out Cloud Star Chewy Tricky Trainers. They’re perfectly sized for any dog, since they’re about the size of a pea. Receiving treats of any size is a reward to a dog, so they can’t tell the difference even if it’s super small. Instead of bulking your dog up with massive, filler-stuff treats, you should aim for smaller, protein-packed bites.
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These best healthy treats for dogs are great for snacks, rewards and training bait. They are definitely one of the best organic dog treats out there, too. Most customers who bought this product had dogs that couldn’t take chicken or other meat products without itching and losing hair. This non-GMO, organic and duck-based treat is also cheaper than many of the best healthy treats for dogs.
As you learned in the video, positive reinforcement is more effective than negative. Reward your dogs for positive behaviors, do not punish her for negative ones. The Association of Professional Dog Trainers (APDT) uses treats to train dogs in their care. The APDT suggests using small, chewy treats to help with timing for your training purposes. You can also be generous and give more treats because the smaller the treat typically means the fewer the calories. (You don’t want to make your dog overweight by giving too many large treats!) Besides, your dog doesn’t care how big the treat is. She just loves that she’s getting so many and getting attention from you!

In terms of what to avoid, start with any artificial additives and agents that are known to cause health problems in dogs. For example, food dyes are unnecessary when choosing the best healthy dog treats and so is glycerin (a preservative), because some studies have shown their dangers. Also, while some dog treats brands still use these, BHT and BHA preservatives may be harmful, according to some experts. That said, some other preservatives can and should be used to avoid spoilage, but only as long as they have been proven to be safe for dogs. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are some of those few that are allowed.

The bones are small, the size of small regular milk bones, and don't have an offensive odor. They're a brown color and are chewy but not super soft by any means. Molly still has to chew for a while to get these to break down. She had a few of them today but I am going to have to cut back because she is starting to want more and more treats and less actual dog food (which I can't blame her for). I think I will limit these to one per day. They come in a great jar with a screw on/off lid so they'll stay fresh for quite a while. There are loads of them in the 25 ounce jar so these are a good value.
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