Yes, I care about my dog and his health. However I don’t have any misconceptions about how long his life will be. He’s a GSD and will live somewhere between 12-15 years. Breaking the bank with all this supposed “SUPER QUALITY/ORGANIC” crap MIGHT get me another year… there’s no telling. Then again, some environmental condition completely out of my control could take my GSD from me 2-4 years earlier no matter how much money I spend on this over-hyped trendy food/treats.
You are asking your dog to complete what may be a complicated task for her — understand a verbal or visual cue and then perform a desired behavior. This may seem straightforward and simple to you, but dogs don’t communicate this way in nature. By harnessing the power of something that is very primal to them — food — you can make learning the task much easier for them.

One of Kimberly's favorite pastimes is spoiling Sally with new toys, comfy beds and yummy treats (she even makes homemade goodies for her). She tries to purchase the safest products for Sally and knows that each canine has their own specific likes and dislikes. Kimberly is passionate about dogs, and knows the bond between humans and canines is like no other.

My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.

Peanut butter and apples are a great snack, whether you're human or canine. Mix together 4 C. flour, 1 tbs. baking powder, 2 3/4 C. water, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 4 tbsp. honey, 1/4 C. finely chopped apple, 1 tbsp. peanut butter and 1 beaten egg. Spoon into small muffin molds and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 75 minutes. Remove chews from the molds as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. For a healthier treat, substitute 1 C. wheat germ for 1 C. of flour, and add 2 tbsp. of ground flax seed.
This means you'll need to do the math, but only once or twice, as you switch to new dog treats and new dog food. After that, always keep track of what type of best healthy dog treats you use, and how many calories each one of them contains, and how often you've spoiled your Fido. Choosing low calorie dog treats is key, and some – like Zuke's treats, mentioned below – may contain as little as 2-3 calories per their mini treat. For dogs, it's still a reward and a pleasurable experience, no matter how small the treat is.
Nothing could possibly be simpler, or meatier, than this treat from Emmy's Best. It's the last but not least option on our best healthy dog treats list that is made of only one ingredient – USDA-certified, Grade A chicken breasts. These thin strips had been dehydrated, preserved naturally, and packed with the natural goodness of pure meat for dogs to relish. They make for a great incentive for dogs undergoing training, or for supplementing their diet. This is a product of the USA and guaranteed free of additives or preservatives.
One concern that a small amount of customers have is that the ingredient list includes both garlic and sodium nitrate, both of which are said to be toxic for canines. A spokesperson from the company assures readers that the amount of each is minimal (less than a few ounces of sodium nitrate per one hundred pounds of meat and less than 1% garlic per batch). He also says there are mixed reports as to whether or not garlic is okay for pets, ensuring that a small amount is not thought to be a threat regardless.
Milk-Bone is the dog treat brand that loving dog owners like you have trusted for over 100 years. Our products are made right here in the US with all of the wholesome, nutritious ingredients you feel good about giving your dog every day. Milk-Bone offers more than 20 varieties of treats, so it’s easy to find one that shows your love in exactly the right way.
If you want to mix in a little seafood to your dog’s diet as an occasional treat, baked salmon can be great healthy and natural dog treats. You have to make sure it’s baked, however, and never give your canine raw fish of any kind. That could not only make your dog extremely sick, it could even be fatal. Salmon is a lean meat and is an excellent source of not only protein but also omega-3 fatty acids. These help make sure your dog’s immune system works as it should, and also promotes a shiny, healthy coat. Look for an easy recipe online for the best way to cook the salmon, and at what temperature.
Below we'll discuss more on how to choose the best dog treats that are healthy and we've used tips and advice from veterinarians and guidelines from several studies and University websites to come up with ranking factors for the best healthy dog treats, and after analyzing hundreds of them, managed to find nine options that fit the bill. Here are the top five picks, with more following down below:

If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.

I just bought my third tub of these MaroSnacks for my Yorkie..She generally doesn't like crunchy snacks preferring chewy ones but she does like these. They're small and have marrow inside which she obviously enjoys because she chews them right up rather than taking them upstairs to hide them. She hides her lesser liked treats for when she is really desperate I guess. Silly dog.
No, not upset – I suppose I read into that a bit. We used to live the the SF bay area and there’s complete PC madness going there. You’re literally given dirty looks by people if you should dare refer to yourself as a pet “owner.” It’s not as if I’ve ever viewed a dog as my “possession” but some crazies there have decided to interpret it as such. My fault for reading into your post a bit too much.
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